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Oct 7, 2014

Finding and Downloading Torrent Files

After you set up your computer, you're ready to download .torrent files. You can search for the term ".torrent" using an Internet search engine to find sites that offer BitTorrent files. There are also a number of sites dedicated to BitTorrent file searching. These include isoHunt and TorrentSpy. Other sites that offer BitTorrent files directly include bt.etree.org for shareable music, Legal Torrents for music, videos and books, and BT on EFnet for recent television shows.
When you find the file you want, right-click the .torrent link, choose "save target as" and save the file in a convenient place on your computer, such as the Windows desktop. The .torrent file, which is a pointer to the actual file you want, will download quickly. Next, double-click the .torrent file you saved to your computer. The BitTorrent client software displays and starts the download process:
As we mentioned before, the more computers in the sending/receiving swarm, the quicker the download process. If you are downloading a file with only a few other computers in the swarm, the transfer speed will be relatively slow.
After the download is complete, leave the BitTorrent client software open so that other peers can download .torrent files from your computer.*

Peers using BitTorrent can download only .torrent files from your computer. Once you have a complete copy of a file, your computer becomes a potential seed for that file -- as long as you're still running the software. Sharing what you have causes speedier BitTorrent downloads for you in the future. You can leave the client software running for a few hours or overnight.* Simply close the software when you're done.
Legal Ramifications Similar to other peer-to-peer software, BitTorrent can be used to download copyrighted material. Because BitTorrent handles large files remarkably well, it is especially popular for downloading video files. The Motion Picture Association of America has filed countless lawsuits, causing at least many high-traffic .torrent download sites to shut down.
BitTorrent itself is perfectly legal to use. When you select a file to download, however, it is your responsibility to make sure the file not copyrighted. BitTorrent downloads are not anonymous information about your computer's IP address and the files you download can be traced back to you.
Despite its improper use by distributors of copyrighted material, the BitTorrent program itself both legal and innovative. With additions such as tit-for-tat and an open-source philosophy, BitTorrent will likely build a legacy of its own while serving as a bridge to the next generation of file-serving software.

Jul 21, 2014

What is Bencoding ?

Bencoding is a way to specify and organize data in a terse format. It supports the following types: byte strings, integers, lists, and dictionaries.

Bencoded Strings

Bencoded strings are encoded as follows: :, or key:value
Note that there is no constant beginning delimiter, and no ending delimiter.
Example4:spam represents the string "spam"

Integers

Integers are encoded as follows: ie
The initial i and trailing e are beginning and ending delimiters. You can have negative numbers such as i-3e. Only the significant digits should be used, one cannot pad the Integer with zeroes. such as i04e. However, i0e is valid.
Examplei3e represents the integer "3"
  • NOTE: The maximum number of bit of this integer is unspecified, but to handle it as a signed 64bit integer is mandatory to handle "large files" aka .torrent for more that 4Gbyte.

Lists

Lists are encoded as follows: le
The initial l and trailing e are beginning and ending delimiters. Lists may contain any bencoded type, including integers, strings, dictionaries, and even lists within other lists.
Example: l4:spam4:eggse represents the list of two strings: [ "spam", "eggs" ]

Dictionaries

Dictionaries are encoded as follows: de
The initial d and trailing e are the beginning and ending delimiters. Note that the keys must be bencoded strings. The values may be any bencoded type, including integers, strings, lists, and other dictionaries. Keys must be strings and appear in sorted order (sorted as raw strings, not alphanumerics). The strings should be compared using a binary comparison, not a culture-specific "natural" comparison.
Exampled3:cow3:moo4:spam4:eggse represents the dictionary { "cow" => "moo", "spam" => "eggs" } 
Exampled4:spaml1:a1:bee' represents the dictionary { "spam" => [ "a", "b" ] } 
Exampled9:publisher3:bob17:publisher-webpage15:www.example.com18:publisher.location4:homee represents { "publisher" => "bob", "publisher-webpage" => "www.example.com", "publisher.location" => "home" }

What is Lurker ?

Lurker

In Internet culture, a lurker is typically a member of an online community who observes, but does not actively participate. The exact definition depends on context. Lurkers make up a large proportion of all users in online communities.Lurking allows users to learn the conventions of an online community before they actively participate, improving their socialization when they eventually de-lurk. However, a lack of social contact while lurking sometimes causes loneliness or apathy among lurkers.

Lurkers are referred to using many names, including browsers, read-only participants, non-public participants, legitimate peripheral participants, or vicarious learners.